Friday, February 27, 2009

Secret #8: Selecting Empowering Partnerships and Alliances


This is our eighth week of our blogging book study on the 12 Secrets of Highly Creative Women, hosted by Jamie Ridler.

As a writer and primarily a homemaker, I do not have a business in which I seek to earn money. My business is the care and keeping of my home and family. My partner in life and love is my husband, Alfred. Without him, I could not do what I do.

His willingness to provide for our family makes it possible for me to be home with our children and to create a cozy home for us all. My job is stretching Alfred's pay as far as I can and ensuring that we live well within our single-income. That, in itself, forces me to be creative on a daily basis.

But I am also a writer and Alfred fully supports this creative side and is my chief cheerleader and encourager, just as I am his. We make a good team.

3 comments:

sarah said...

I believe homekeeping is the most important job there is. I think we see that, in those few decades when a mother's only job was to make a sheltering, supportive home for her family, crime rates were lower and society had more cohesion. Now that women are out in work from three months after their children are born, and the home has become cold, barely inhabited, crime rates have soared and depression, ADHD, alcoholism, violence, are all high.

I'm not saying women should stay at home - only that someone should, or at least there should be more understanding of the importance of the home, especially in this vast overwhelming modern world. I wish feminists had understood that and insisted on society valuing the homekeeper's work, not tried instead to become like men.

Genie Sea said...

You make a great team indeed! The work you are doing is monumental! The creativity is takes might be unsung, but it is powerful. :)

Aunt Amelia's Attic said...

Every marriage should be a good team. {In my humble opinion, that is.} So glad you are!

Aunt Amelia
"It seems a long time since the morning mail could be called correspondence." ~Jacques Barzun