Monday, February 09, 2009

The Not-so-Good Day


Today was not a good day. The Paxil is not working for me. It is, in fact, making things worse. I had a major panic attack today...the worst one ever and it was so horrible. It was a great setback. The kicker is, I called the doctor's office and left a message for a nurse to call back. No one called! Needless to say, I will not continue taking the medicine. I don't know what else to do.

I just want to be well...

3 comments:

sarah said...

Just breathe, honey. I wish I could be there to hold your hand and help you through it. Sometimes medication can have a paradoxical effect, especially on people who are sensitive. I'm glad you're going to stop taking it.

Everything is going to be okay. You will get through this - and you will break the cycle. It CAN be done.

You already understand that you are having panic attacks, and this is a huge part of the battle already won. Oh my, I wish I could write you a huge long letter about all the things you can do to break this awful cycle ... but the three most important are:

Breathe. I don't mean during the attack, as you're hyperventilating anyway and focussing on your breathing may make it worse. But in ordinary times, listen to your breathing. Practice improving it. Put one hand on your chest, the other on your stomach, and make sure when you breathe its your stomach moving out, not your chest. Ensure you have good posture, as this will help. And consider something like yoga. During the attack, you may benefit from breathing into a paper bag - although some people feel this is a little suffocating, it helps many others.

Distract yourself. During an attack, make sure you have something that can help you focus and distract your thoughts. One of the easiest ways to do this is to "eat something and change your environment." I can not speak highly enough about the value of distraction. Laughter is also very helpful. Even if you don't feel like laughing! It releases happy chemicals and helps regulate the breathing.

The third thing is to understand why you are experiencing certain symptoms. Have you read all about panic attacks? Do you understand why your lips go tingly and your fingers go numb and your heartbeat races? These are all normal biochemical responses. Knowing why the panic symptoms are there can help you panic less about them.

((hugs)) dearest Tracy. Everything really is going to be alright.

sarah said...

Just breathe, honey. I wish I could be there to hold your hand and help you through it. Sometimes medication can have a paradoxical effect, especially on people who are sensitive. I'm glad you're going to stop taking it.

Everything is going to be okay. You will get through this - and you will break the cycle. It CAN be done.

You already understand that you are having panic attacks, and this is a huge part of the battle already won. Oh my, I wish I could write you a huge long letter about all the things you can do to break this awful cycle ... but the three most important are:

Breathe. I don't mean during the attack, as you're hyperventilating anyway and focussing on your breathing may make it worse. But in ordinary times, listen to your breathing. Practice improving it. Put one hand on your chest, the other on your stomach, and make sure when you breathe its your stomach moving out, not your chest. Ensure you have good posture, as this will help. And consider something like yoga. During the attack, you may benefit from breathing into a paper bag - although some people feel this is a little suffocating, it helps many others.

Distract yourself. During an attack, make sure you have something that can help you focus and distract your thoughts. One of the easiest ways to do this is to "eat something and change your environment." I can not speak highly enough about the value of distraction. Laughter is also very helpful. Even if you don't feel like laughing! It releases happy chemicals and helps regulate the breathing.

The third thing is to understand why you are experiencing certain symptoms. Have you read all about panic attacks? Do you understand why your lips go tingly and your fingers go numb and your heartbeat races? These are all normal biochemical responses. Knowing why the panic symptoms are there can help you panic less about them.

((hugs)) dearest Tracy. Everything really is going to be alright.

(posted again, I don't know if it went through)

Jane said...

Hang in there. A few years ago, I was in a similar situation. Sometimes you have to get off one and try another until you find the one that works instead of making you feel worse. It's an annoying process but once you have the right med, it will make all the difference.